Heavy Metalloid Music: The Story Of Simply Saucer by Jesse Locke (Eternal Cavalier)


Books about underground bands like The Velvet Underground, Big Star, MC5 or The Stooges usually create the impression they were so far ahead of their time that nobody appreciated them when they were around. Reading Jesse Locke’s book on Simply Saucer made me realize just how lucky those groups actually were. True, they didn’t have the level of success they deserved, but at least they had the advantage of operating out hip urban centers that gave them access to major label deals, tours and support from the music press. Playing psychedelically-charged proto-punk in early-’70s Hamilton, Ontario (a place I can’t even point to on a map – though that may say more about me than Ontario) made Simply Saucer perennial outsiders. Even though they had serious songwriting chops and an exciting experimental edge, there just wasn’t any kind of local network for them to tap into. Without the opportunity to catch the ear of a clued-in benefactor like a Danny Fields, Lester Bangs, David Bowie or Andy Warhol, Simply Saucer never toured, never put out an album (their only official release until 1989 was a highly-unrepresentative 7″ single), and made such a faint impression that for about a decade after they broke up it was almost like they never existed. However, no matter how deep it’s buried, good music always finds a way to surface given time, and 1989’s posthumous compilation Cyborgs Revisited finally gave the world a much needed document of what the band were capable of. If you haven’t heard it, track it down.

Jesse Locke’s book, named after a phrase singer Edgar Breau used to introduce the live version of their song “Illegal Bodies” heard on Cyborgs Revisited, charts Simply Saucer’s silent explosion, with a well-researched band history from formation up through the past decade since they re-launched in 2006. Locke covers those musically vital early years with fascinating stories of drugs, personal battles, strange performances and crazy bohemian lifestyles – the kind of stuff you’ve come to expect from a worthwhile rock bio. He certainly gets much deeper into their history than I could when I interviewed Edgar Breau a few years back. But perhaps most interesting is the way Locke documents how Simply Saucer’s legend stayed alive after they broke up in 1979, through a small but fervent network of musicians and tape-trading record geeks who, once they heard the band’s mid-’70s demos and live performances, were compelled to spread the word to like-minded peers. With the band’s best music now properly preserved, the future is looking up for Simply Saucer. In addition to Heavy Metalloid Music, there’s a documentary film and a 2cd reissue of Cyborgs Revisited on In The Red Records both promised for 2017. Perhaps they’ll finally get some of the acclaim they should’ve had over 40 years ago. Better late than never.

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